Broadcast journalism – Clatskanie Chief News http://clatskaniechiefnews.com/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 01:43:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-15-120x120.png Broadcast journalism – Clatskanie Chief News http://clatskaniechiefnews.com/ 32 32 Emily Maitlis marked the ‘Meghan Markle of broadcast journalism’ during a sudden stop | United Kingdom | New https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/emily-maitlis-marked-the-meghan-markle-of-broadcast-journalism-during-a-sudden-stop-united-kingdom-new/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 07:16:00 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/emily-maitlis-marked-the-meghan-markle-of-broadcast-journalism-during-a-sudden-stop-united-kingdom-new/ Daily Telegraph columnist Allison Pearson has drawn comparisons between the former Newsnight host’s departure from the taxpayer-funded society and the Duchess of Sussex’s sensational exit from the Royal Family. Ms Pearson launched a scathing attack on Ms Maitlis and accused her of being a ‘budding star who turns interviews into a story about her’ after […]]]>

Daily Telegraph columnist Allison Pearson has drawn comparisons between the former Newsnight host’s departure from the taxpayer-funded society and the Duchess of Sussex’s sensational exit from the Royal Family. Ms Pearson launched a scathing attack on Ms Maitlis and accused her of being a ‘budding star who turns interviews into a story about her’ after she left the BBC after 20 years.

It comes after Ms Maitlis slammed her former employer when she likened the BBC’s impartiality rules to ‘censorship’ after her stint on a daily podcast at rival broadcaster LBC.

Duchess Meghan also made a number of very critical comments about society following her exit from royal life in 2020.

Ms Pearson wrote: “I fear Maitlis is the Meghan Markle of broadcast journalism.

“While self-effacing presenters like Sophie Raworth quietly continue their work (I have no idea what Raworth’s opinions are), Maitlis aspires to be an American-style presenter with a trailer dedicated to her ego.

“He’s the budding star who turns interviews into a story about him.

“The BBC, which it now so absurdly condemns for bowing to the right, gave Maitlis a prestigious platform and an audience of millions.

READ MORE: Emily Maitlis accuses BBC of siding with TORIES in furious outburst

Speaking at the Edinburgh Television Festival, Ms Maitlis said: ‘Why did the BBC immediately and publicly seek to confirm the opinion of the government spokesperson, without any kind of due process? This makes no sense for an organization that is, admirably, reputed to be procedurally rigorous – unless perhaps it is sending a message of reassurance directly to the government itself? »

She added: “Put this in the context of the BBC’s board, where another active Tory operative now sits – the former Downing Street spin doctor and former adviser to BBC rival GB News – , acting as arbiter of the impartiality of the BBC.”

Speaking in another interview with The Observer, Ms Maitlis said of her current employer LBC: “Impartiality will be really important to us here. We’re not trying to do shocking stuff. We are not trying to shout opinions to the world.

“Impartiality, in its truest sense, is covering stories without fear or favor. I get nervous when impartiality is used as a way to silence journalists. Is it because you were asking questions you didn’t shouldn’t have asked?

“I don’t think that’s impartiality – it’s censorship. And if your journalism is going to suffer by staying somewhere where you can’t ask those questions, what do you do, right? In response to the criticism, the company issued a statement saying: “The BBC places the highest value on impartiality and accuracy and we apply these principles to our reporting on all matters.

“As we have made clear previously in relation to Newsnight, we have taken no action as a result of any pressure from Number 10 or the Government and to suggest otherwise is false. The BBC has found that the show breached its editorial standards and that decision still stands.”

Ms Maitlis first joined Newsnight in 2006 and her most famous interview on the current affairs show came when she sat down with Prince Andrew in November 2019 to discuss her relationship with the convicted sex offender Jeffery Epstein.

The interview saw her win Network Presenter of the Year at the RTS Television Journalism Awards in 2020.

She now works with Global alongside BBC correspondent Jon, who began his career at the BBC in 1983 as chief political correspondent for BBC News 24 and in 2005 replaced Jeremy Vine as main presenter of The Politics Show.

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Lesley Stahl reflects on her career in broadcast journalism https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/lesley-stahl-reflects-on-her-career-in-broadcast-journalism/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 00:22:13 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/lesley-stahl-reflects-on-her-career-in-broadcast-journalism/ Although veteran journalist Lesley Stahl has interviewed controversial political figures like Margaret Thatcher and Donald Trump, it’s the human interest stories that resonate more with her. “It’s never those heads of state that stick out, really, in my mind,” Stahl said. “It’s really the human interest stories that remain, especially the sad ones. Parents of […]]]>

Although veteran journalist Lesley Stahl has interviewed controversial political figures like Margaret Thatcher and Donald Trump, it’s the human interest stories that resonate more with her.

“It’s never those heads of state that stick out, really, in my mind,” Stahl said. “It’s really the human interest stories that remain, especially the sad ones. Parents of desperately ill children who don’t have enough money for treatment, these kinds of stories live in my heart.

She then recalled an interview she had with a gay teenager and his mother who was sending him to a conversion therapy camp. “My heart was breaking then and I’m telling you, and I can still feel it,” Stahl said. “Sometimes I’m so angry inside,” she added.

Stahl, who worked as a correspondent for CBS News’ “60 Minutes” for more than 30 years, received this year Variety and Rolling Stone Truth Seekers Award. She then sat down for a conversation with Variety co-editor Cynthia Littleton for the Variety and Rolling Stone Truth Seekers Summit presented by Showtime Documentary Films.

Asked about the future of broadcast journalism, Stahl cited three pressures: politics, financial issues and technology. “Because of technology, journalists no longer have time to think,” Stahl said.

She continued: “There’s no time to hear the other side, there’s no time to think about the story – the pressures are enormous and they don’t contribute to better journalism, in my opinion.”

At the end, Stahl spoke about her late husband Aaron Latham, who was a regular contributor to Rolling Stone for years. “He loved working with Jann Wenner and had a great career as a magazine writer,” she said. “And he wrote two articles for Rolling Stone which he turned into a film [1985’s ‘Perfect’] where Jann Wenner was.

Watch the full conversation above.

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EDITORIAL: LaFlamme takeover proves no one is immune as broadcast journalism finds its place in the digital age https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/editorial-laflamme-takeover-proves-no-one-is-immune-as-broadcast-journalism-finds-its-place-in-the-digital-age/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 22:51:38 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/editorial-laflamme-takeover-proves-no-one-is-immune-as-broadcast-journalism-finds-its-place-in-the-digital-age/ CTV National News’ Lisa LaFlamme poses with her award for best television news anchor backstage at the 2015 Canadian Screen Awards in Toronto, March 1, 2015. REUTERS/Fred Thornhill (Alamy) When Wade Oosterman took the lead Bell Media early last year, he reported that the division was going through an unprecedented transition after three rounds of […]]]>
CTV National News’ Lisa LaFlamme poses with her award for best television news anchor backstage at the 2015 Canadian Screen Awards in Toronto, March 1, 2015. REUTERS/Fred Thornhill (Alamy)

When Wade Oosterman took the lead Bell Media early last year, he reported that the division was going through an unprecedented transition after three rounds of layoffs from top to bottom – from executive level to more than 200 frontline staff – numerous presenters, journalists and hosts well-known and long-standing through radio and television.

In his first memo to employees as president of Bell Media in February 2021, the former head of Bell Mobility called the restructuring “an unfortunate and often highly publicized reflection of the change needed for Bell Media to prevail in a transforming industry that has also been particularly hard hit by COVID-19.”

He added that the division’s updated structure reflects “the reality of the sweeping changes facing our organization…the way Canadians consume media, the continued torrent of new viewing and listening options…”

by Lisa LaFlamme sudden release as news anchor of CTV National News illustrates that no one is immune as terrestrial TV audiences dwindle in the ‘money’ demo of 18-49 year olds and traditional broadcasters struggle to carve out a path to digital revenue, especially when it comes to information.

Amid the outrage on social media, some thought it was a clear case of ageism, others a diversity game with the hiring of Omar Sachedina, who will very ably assume the role of presenter-in-chief and editor-in-chief in September. I myself was questioned by the Toronto Star to weigh their coverage in which I suggested that the underlying motivation for the move is likely Bell Media’s desire to pursue revenue streams consistent with changing consumer behavior.

Layoffs are nothing new, nor is the lack of civility, nor the focus on returning media companies owned by publicly traded entities to shareholders.

What is new is the virtual certainty now that most journalists and other media professionals will be hired prematurely, cutting short their careers and, in the process, the acquired wisdom, experience and knowledge that have always been the editorial flagships of newsrooms around the world.

As a journalist friend recently observed, “Our newsroom’s institutional memory is disappearing day by day.”

Lloyd Robertson and Lisa LaFlamme

There are few journalists in today’s television landscape who will receive the kind of farewell Lloyd Robertson was granted when he was allowed to gracefully leave the network at age 77 after 41 years as a national news anchor (though it was a decade before the major move to streaming) or Pierre Mansbridge when he retired Radio Canada in 2017 at age 69, capping a career spanning more than 45 years with the public broadcaster.

In the current climate, the lifespan of most careers in broadcast journalism is now 20 to 30 years, regardless of those who will leave to pursue opportunities outside the industry or escape the burden of increasing workload and growing harassment.

It’s not all bad news. The decline in traditional newsroom resources is offset to some extent by growth in digital positions and new media and platforms. Good journalism continues to be produced, and many laid off people have reinvented themselves as podcasters and Sub-stack bloggers. But in a precarious landscape for journalists working in precarious times, let’s not forget the value of lived experience in our newsrooms as broadcast journalism finds its place in the digital age.


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Broadcast journalism veteran Jen Maxfield on perfecting the interview https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/broadcast-journalism-veteran-jen-maxfield-on-perfecting-the-interview/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 15:09:26 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/broadcast-journalism-veteran-jen-maxfield-on-perfecting-the-interview/ An American presenter, journalist and author shares all the lessons (and rookie mistakes) of 20 years in local TV news Subscribe to the Journalism.co.uk podcast at Apple podcast, sound cloud and Spotify Without a doubt, a basic skill of any budding journalist is to interview, but knowing what questions to ask is only a […]]]>

An American presenter, journalist and author shares all the lessons (and rookie mistakes) of 20 years in local TV news


Subscribe to the Journalism.co.uk podcast at Apple podcast, sound cloud and Spotify

Without a doubt, a basic skill of any budding journalist is to interview, but knowing what questions to ask is only a fraction of the skill involved.

In fact, it’ll only get you so far without the other crucial, and often underestimated, part of maintenance: listen. That’s why so many journalists will insist that the best soundbites that end up in the final cut are the result of follow-up questions or unexpected additional remarks.

Arguably, nowhere is this more important than in the broadcast interview, where you are often confronted with an ongoing situation or a sensitive story.

In this week’s podcast, we talk to Jen Maxfield, an Emmy-winning journalist and presenter with over 20 years of experience, working for various US stations, including NBC New York, Eyewitness News and WIXT.

She made a name for herself by specializing in field journalism and local television. During the podcast, she shares expert advice on the many types of interview situations journalists can encounter, including how to learn from your rookie mistakes — what makes seasoned pros so good at their craft.

Maxfield teaches broadcast journalism as an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in New York and is the author of ‘More after the break in which she looks back on ten of her most significant news stories.

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Notable people who studied broadcast journalism https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/notable-people-who-studied-broadcast-journalism/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 23:10:03 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/notable-people-who-studied-broadcast-journalism/ ” class=”lazy img-responsive” data-src=”https://www.iwmbuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/notorious-figures-who-stuied-broadcast-journalism-4-920×518. jpeg” width=”920″ height=”518″ alt=”Notorious people who studied broadcast journalism” /> Light, camera, action! Celebrities frequently appear on our television and movie screens. However, not all film and television personalities started their careers as actors. For our aspiring broadcast journalism students, it can be comforting to know that the skills learned at […]]]>
” class=”lazy img-responsive” data-src=”https://www.iwmbuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/notorious-figures-who-stuied-broadcast-journalism-4-920×518. jpeg” width=”920″ height=”518″ alt=”Notorious people who studied broadcast journalism” />

Light, camera, action! Celebrities frequently appear on our television and movie screens. However, not all film and television personalities started their careers as actors. For our aspiring broadcast journalism students, it can be comforting to know that the skills learned at NYFA’s Broadcast Journalism Conservatory translate well to a range of vocations, including life in the spotlight.

Matthew McConaughey

The University of Texas at Austin awarded Matthew McConaughey a bachelor’s degree in radio, television, and film in 1993. After graduating from college, McConaughey intended to go to law school, but he soon fell realized that he had no interest in practicing law.

Letterman, David

The Ball State University Radio and Television Program in Muncie, Indiana awarded David Letterman his degree. At student radio station WBST, he began his broadcasting career as an announcer and news anchor while still in college. After being fired, Letterman joined forces with WAGO-AM 570, a student radio station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0d3FKQpM9A

Stern, Howard

Although Howard Stern is best known as a radio host, he is also a television host, author, and actor. Stern graduated with a degree in communications from Boston University with honors. He also earned a certificate from the Radio Engineering Institute of Electronics in Fredericksburg, Virginia. He eventually obtained a first-class radiotelephone operator’s license, which is a document required by the Federal Communications Commission for all broadcasters.

Seinfeld, Jerry

Jerry Seinfeld originally enrolled at Oswego State University in New York. However, he switched to Queens College, City University of New York in his sophomore year. He earned degrees in theater and communication.

wendy williams

Not your usual host of a daytime chat program, Wendy Williams is unique. Williams studied communications for her Bachelor of Arts at Northeastern University in Boston from 1982 to 1986. She worked as a DJ for radio station WRBB when she was a student.

Also Read: TXT Members Chose Western Artists To Collaborate With: Do You Know Who They Are?

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Amanda Busick ’08 Brings Entrepreneurship to the World of Broadcast Journalism https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/amanda-busick-08-brings-entrepreneurship-to-the-world-of-broadcast-journalism/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 12:33:45 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/amanda-busick-08-brings-entrepreneurship-to-the-world-of-broadcast-journalism/ By Lea Hart Amanda Busick (’08) may not have taken the ‘traditional route’ when she graduated from Poole College of Management with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, concentration in entrepreneurship, but the spirit of The enterprise instilled in NC State was nevertheless crucial. Busick is an award-winning sports journalist specializing in motorsports. Currently […]]]>

By Lea Hart

Amanda Busick (’08) may not have taken the ‘traditional route’ when she graduated from Poole College of Management with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, concentration in entrepreneurship, but the spirit of The enterprise instilled in NC State was nevertheless crucial.

Busick is an award-winning sports journalist specializing in motorsports. Currently working freelance, her impressive list of roles includes reporting for the National Hot Rod Association on FOX Sports, as a Pit Lane anchor and reporter for the SRO America GT World Challenge on CBS Sports, and a number of other roles, some of which focus on women in motorsport. She is also an event host and presenter, having recently served as a live event host at the official announcement of the Formula 1 Grand Prix in Las Vegas.

Arrive early at NC State

Busick grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina and attended Northeast Guilford High School. She had enough credits to graduate from high school a semester early and applied to NC State because the university was accepting entry-level students.

“Without a doubt, it’s the best decision I’ve ever made,” she said. “The entrepreneurship program has changed my life.”

Without a doubt, it’s the best decision I’ve ever made. The entrepreneurship program has changed my life.

At the same time, his goal has always been to do something in the media. She had a special love for the sport, growing up watching games at Carter-Finley Stadium and Reynolds Coliseum. She laughs that the two times a year they were allowed to skip class in her family were the ACC Tournament and the NC State Fair. She interned with WFMY 2 while in college, focusing on sports broadcasting.

The entrepreneurial spirit had also surrounded her growing up. His father owned his own business. Tragically, he was killed in a work accident when she was three years old. Her mother took over the business, building highways for the state, and Busick grew up with an entrepreneurial female role model at the center of her life.

“She was a female business owner,” Busick said. “Moving from that traumatic event to leading a business in what was an unconventional role for women was inspirational.”

The entrepreneurship program was new to Poole College when Busick enrolled and she embraced the program. Project-based work has paired her with College of Engineering and College of Design students, providing unique opportunities for collaboration and idea sharing.

“Working with these colleges was so special back then,” she said. “It boosted my motivation and my desire to succeed.

“I felt like I had received a special gift.”

Pursuing what she loved, despite the obstacles

Graduation came just as the recession hit in 2008, and jobs were scarce. She had worked at Sullivan’s Steakhouse in college and returned there. But Busick never lost his drive or his entrepreneurial spirit. At a time when students were graduating and leaving the area to work elsewhere, Busick decided to work on a series of videos showcasing Raleigh and all there was to love about living there.

She ended up covering the Jimmy V Celebrity Golf Tournament, interviewing the sports celebrities in attendance and turning it into a reel to showcase her own talents and abilities.

From there, she returned to media and journalism, moving to New York City where she served tables at night and interned during the day.

“The kids I sponsor now, I ask them about their financial strategy around their careers,” she said. “You can use that first, second, or third job so you can support yourself while pursuing your passion.

“Flexibility in the hospitality industry was key for me.”

The road from there wasn’t always easy, but through hard work and networking, Busick made a name for himself.

She logged into the ACC network in Charlotte, and although they didn’t have room for her at the time, she continued to check in once a month until she was offered a place about a year later. This brought her to Chicago where they had founded a new college sports network. She started out as a production assistant and one of only six employees.

“When you’re one of the six, you do it all – it sparked this entrepreneurial side in me,” Busick said.

When introduced to her colleagues there, Busick was called “the one who wouldn’t leave us alone”.

“That’s how it went – my impatience is kind of my ambition,” she said. “I had this relentlessness, especially in my twenties, that my foot had to be in the door in front of my contemporaries.”

With so many people wanting to work in the sport, Busick said it involves a lot of sacrifice.

“Sometimes it’s the paycheck, sometimes it’s the life…you’re definitely going to miss a lot,” she said. “It’s the love of work that keeps you going.”

For Busick, the sacrifice seems to have paid off. She then hit the road for ESPN, where she was assigned to work with Beth Mowins, a longtime sportswriter who impacted Busick as another female role model.

A family emergency prompted Busick to leave the business altogether, and she spent time in an entirely different career, selling meat in 2015. She thought she wouldn’t be returning to the business then, but eight months later, Busick heard of an opportunity with the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) for a multimedia journalist.

She was off again, flying out to one of their national events and making some content to showcase her talents. They invited her to host their red carpet event and offered her a job that night – Busick had left for Los Angeles.

Momentum built from there – Busick was hired as a broadcaster for the NHRA on behalf of FOX Sports, and by 2019 had built her career and network to such an extent that she was able to go independent, return to North Carolina, and work on behalf of a number of clients in broadcast and event roles.

Attach everything to the beginning

When asked how this degree in entrepreneurship prepared her for this path, Busick quickly replied, “that was it.”

“I was working on internships, giving mock pitches to local VCs or angel investors,” she said. “I remember I failed the first one – it was such a learning experience; you don’t know what you don’t know.

Understanding presentation styles and expecting her to meet “real world” expectations while she was still in college was exactly the training Busick needed.

She also credits faculty as the key to her success.

Their pursuit of excellence was something I gravitated towards. It was the whole idea of ​​doing what you love.

“Their pursuit of excellence was something I gravitated toward,” she said. “It was the whole idea of ​​doing what you love.”

The words of an NC State entrepreneurship professor still resonate in his head today, “luck favors the prepared mind.”

“NC State is what prepared me,” she said.

With so many moments in life and choices that can be made that lead up to that “next step,” Busick said she wasn’t sure she would be where she is today without NC State.

“It was the whole collection – the path of my education, the teachers in my life who were completely irreplaceable, the community that I was able to build from our former students,” she said. “I don’t think I would be where I am right now without it.”

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Global Launches Broadcast Journalism Apprenticeship Program – ATV Today https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/global-launches-broadcast-journalism-apprenticeship-program-atv-today/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 03:27:31 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/global-launches-broadcast-journalism-apprenticeship-program-atv-today/ Global offers early career opportunities in its world-class newsroom… Successful candidates will study with PA training for an NCTJ Diploma in Journalism – the essential industry qualification Applications are now open for two new apprenticeship positions at Global’s newsrooms in Manchester and Birmingham. The program will offer 24-month internships that will provide first-hand experience in […]]]>
Global offers early career opportunities in its world-class newsroom…

Successful candidates will study with PA training for an NCTJ Diploma in Journalism – the essential industry qualification

Applications are now open for two new apprenticeship positions at Global’s newsrooms in Manchester and Birmingham. The program will offer 24-month internships that will provide first-hand experience in the production of world-class news programming as well as a qualification equivalent to a university degree.

Global is one of the world’s leading media and entertainment groups and its market-leading radio brands reach 25.8 million people every week. Global’s newsroom produces local and national news bulletins that air on all Global stations, including Heart, Capital, Radio X and Smooth. Journalists working in global newsrooms also provide information to LBC, the UK’s number one commercial brand, which reaches 3.5 million listeners every week.

Successful applicants will work with Global editors, senior broadcast journalists, social media teams and LBC producers. Day-to-day responsibilities include researching audio and video interviews for local and national services, producing content for LBC and LBC News, and supporting breaking news.

For one day a week, for 18 months, they will also study towards an NCTJ Diploma in Journalism by completing modules including media law, ethics and broadcast regulation. The course will be delivered by PA Training, a leading provider of journalism, public relations and communications courses, and the sister company of PA Media, the national news agency of the UK and Ireland.

Tim John, Global Editor for LBC News and the Global Newsroom:

“This is a great opportunity for anyone with a passion for news and news production, a love of social media and an eye for unique content that will resonate with Global’s broad audience.

“No prior experience is necessary as we want the opportunities to be open to everyone and remove all barriers to the industry. PA Training is an award-winning learning provider, so I am delighted that our new hires also have access to their support and expertise.

Global recently announced D’angelo Briscoe (aka Dynamic), as the new host of Capital XTRA’s Monday-Friday show between 1am and 4am. Dynamic began his career as a programming apprentice at Capital in 2018 after graduating from Global Academy, the school founded by Global to help lower barriers to entry into the media industry and prepare young people to careers in the creative and broadcasting industries.

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Tri-County TV journalism icon dies https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/tri-county-tv-journalism-icon-dies/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:01:00 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/tri-county-tv-journalism-icon-dies/ He was one of the most recognizable faces of local television on the Central and South Coast in the 1980s and 90s. And, he helped launch the careers of dozens of broadcast journalists working across the country. Tri-Counties television news icon King Harris has died. Harris joined the Santa Barbara television station KEYT in 1980, […]]]>

He was one of the most recognizable faces of local television on the Central and South Coast in the 1980s and 90s. And, he helped launch the careers of dozens of broadcast journalists working across the country.

Tri-Counties television news icon King Harris has died.

Harris joined the Santa Barbara television station KEYT in 1980, becoming its main anchor as well as news director. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he assembled a news crew that would go to work at some of the biggest stations in the country.

It included Paul Vercammen, who is now at CNN, Jennifer Bjorklund, who works for NBC, KCRA Sacramento anchor Edie Lambert and award-winning Seattle journalist Matt Markovich. It also launched the careers of several videographers, editors and producers.

He was at KEYT until the late 1990s. He then moved to the Central Coast, where he worked at KCOY in Santa Maria, and taught journalism at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

But, he returned to his original roots in radio late in his career, doing two stints as News/Talk KVEC in San Luis Obispo, where he was news director, and anchoring the morning news . He finally retired in 2015.

Harris collapsed Tuesday night at his home in Arroyo Grande, and efforts to revive him were unsuccessful. He was 75 years old.

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Scripps, Google Partner on Broadcast Journalism Initiative https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/scripps-google-partner-on-broadcast-journalism-initiative/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:42:41 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/scripps-google-partner-on-broadcast-journalism-initiative/ CINCINNATI—The EW Scripps Company and Google announced that they will work together on a multi-year initiative to help experienced journalists with primarily print backgrounds transition their careers into careers in broadcast media. As part of this effort, Google has made a financial commitment to Scripps to subscribe to the new Scripps Journalism Journey Initiative. The […]]]>

CINCINNATI—The EW Scripps Company and Google announced that they will work together on a multi-year initiative to help experienced journalists with primarily print backgrounds transition their careers into careers in broadcast media.

As part of this effort, Google has made a financial commitment to Scripps to subscribe to the new Scripps Journalism Journey Initiative.

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University professor in audiovisual journalism https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/university-professor-in-audiovisual-journalism/ Thu, 12 May 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/university-professor-in-audiovisual-journalism/ We are looking to recruit a full-time university teacher to help teach journalism in our programs, bringing recent professional experience in broadcast journalism to enhance our undergraduate and postgraduate offerings. You will have a minimum of an undergraduate degree or equivalent levels of experience and substantial recent experience in broadcast journalism at a senior […]]]>

We are looking to recruit a full-time university teacher to help teach journalism in our programs, bringing recent professional experience in broadcast journalism to enhance our undergraduate and postgraduate offerings.

You will have a minimum of an undergraduate degree or equivalent levels of experience and substantial recent experience in broadcast journalism at a senior and national level, and you will be expected to keep abreast of developments in journalism practice and integrate them directly into your teaching. We are looking to recruit someone who covers all elements of broadcast, camera, digital and television studio skills.

A solid knowledge of Adobe Premiere Pro, television news production and a working knowledge of studio and gallery skills are essential, as well as the structure and creation of journalistic visual narratives. Camera production skills, using both video cameras and smartphones, are also crucial. Those with experience scoring factual shorts are also encouraged to apply and experience with radio, podcasting and other forms of broadcast platforms is desirable.

We are particularly interested in candidates who can bring their knowledge and experience of improving and addressing diversity and equality in newsrooms and media. We are also looking for candidates who can bring innovation to our teaching and translate your experience into effective and innovative teaching through a combination of online and face-to-face courses. You may have or are in the process of obtaining a postgraduate degree in teaching. The experience of accrediting bodies such as NCTJ and BJTC will be helpful.

We believe in the power of diversity to help us meet major global challenges and aim to actively build diverse teams. We especially welcome applications from groups currently underrepresented within the department, including LGBT+, disabled, and applicants from Black, Asian, and minority backgrounds.

Candidates without previous higher education experience will need to undertake training and development of learning and teaching skills.

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