high school – Clatskanie Chief News http://clatskaniechiefnews.com/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 02:03:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-15-120x120.png high school – Clatskanie Chief News http://clatskaniechiefnews.com/ 32 32 Carlsbad Broadcast Journalism Students Win National Awards https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/carlsbad-broadcast-journalism-students-win-national-awards/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 17:42:10 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/carlsbad-broadcast-journalism-students-win-national-awards/ CARLSBAD – Once again, local students stand at the top of the broadcasting world. Carlsbad High School and Valley High School broadcast journalism programs, with help from students from Sage Creek High School and Aviara Oaks High School, won top prizes at the National Student Television Network’s annual convention on Feb. 20 in Long Beach. […]]]>

CARLSBAD – Once again, local students stand at the top of the broadcasting world.

Carlsbad High School and Valley High School broadcast journalism programs, with help from students from Sage Creek High School and Aviara Oaks High School, won top prizes at the National Student Television Network’s annual convention on Feb. 20 in Long Beach.

Carlsbad High School’s CHSTV, one of the nation’s top high school television stations, won 11 awards overall, including its 16th Lifetime Achievement Award. Valley Middle School students have won the school’s 14th straight Lifetime Achievement Award, making it one of the top college broadcast journalism programs in the nation.

Both programs are taught by broadcast journalism professor Doug Green, who was named National Broadcast Teacher of the Year 2021-22 and California Teacher of the Year 2016.

The Carlsbad High School television crew works on a project during the National Student Television Network’s annual convention February 20 in Long Beach. Courtesy picture

“One of the great stories is that we brought seven students from Sage Creek and they competed with Carlsbad High School…and we brought two (students) from Aviara,” Green said. “So really, it was Carlsbad who did well.”

At the convention, students participated in a number of workshops and breakout sessions with industry professionals. In addition, each school divides into groups of three or four students to produce smaller stories.

Convention students also participated in the “Crazy 8 Contest”, which requires students to travel the city of Long Beach and write, film, edit and broadcast a morning show segment in eight hours.

“(Student Television Network) is such a special experience because of the unique atmosphere created by surrounding yourself with thousands of like-minded peers,” said Ben Hanan of Carlsbad High. “It is inherently inspiring to learn not only from industry professionals, but also from other students who share a similar passion for telling stories.”

Green said one of the challenges of the “Crazy 8 Contest” is that most students are unfamiliar with the city, which adds to the difficulty of the project. But Green said his students overcame those challenges and created great projects.

Doug Green teaches the broadcast journalism program at Carlsbad High School and Valley Middle School
Doug Green teaches the broadcast journalism program at Carlsbad High School and Valley Middle School. Courtesy picture

Luke Schultz, a 14-year-old eighth grader at Valley Middle School, said the breakout sessions were informative and the students learned from filmmakers, broadcasters, journalists and other professionals. Schultz said the sessions included critiques and advice on how to be a better broadcaster and break into the industry.

Valley Middle School ran into some technical difficulties after the team produced what 13-year-old Val Bedoya said was the best story in the program. Bedoya’s small team encountered a corrupted file and missed the story submission deadline.

But the Valley Middle students adapted to the difficulties and created a spin-off story on the fly, learning how quickly time flies when they hit a deadline.

Bedoya, an eighth grader at Valley Middle, said the team was often so focused it was easy to lose track of time.

“You think you have so much time, but there’s a huge lack of time,” Bedoya said. “It just goes away. It’s a lot more stressful than it looks. »

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Graduate students turn to broadcast journalism https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/graduate-students-turn-to-broadcast-journalism/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 02:32:04 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/graduate-students-turn-to-broadcast-journalism/ February 8 – SUPERIOR – A sign on the study hall window warns: Registration in progress, please pass quietly. Behind glass on the second floor of Upper High School, Xalia Raabel manages the camera, the computer used for a teleprompter, and spots anchor Jack Curtis, while Dale Summerfield Jr. sits in the corner and manages […]]]>

February 8 – SUPERIOR – A sign on the study hall window warns: Registration in progress, please pass quietly.

Behind glass on the second floor of Upper High School, Xalia Raabel manages the camera, the computer used for a teleprompter, and spots anchor Jack Curtis, while Dale Summerfield Jr. sits in the corner and manages graphics on a screen behind Curtis’ left shoulder. .

Raabel points and Curtis begins talking about the week’s news at senior high school – weather, sports, and the latest offerings in the school cafeteria as well as events in the greater community.

After several takes, Curtis rushes out the door on Thursday, February 3, saying they’ll use cue cards next time.

It’s all part of the learning process as the students who produce the student newspaper, the Spartan Spin, now share the news through a weekly webcast. The first webcast aired on January 28 on Spin’s website,

spartanspin.com

.

“I want to introduce them to as many elements of journalism as I can introduce them to,” said Andy Wolfe, the senior high school teacher who teaches journalism. “I thought we had to do video and thought what better than to have weekly deadlines where they’re forced to do that.”

Wolfe said when the website launched three or four years ago, he knew he had to offer more than just text and graphics, components of the print newspaper. He said the electronic format should offer a variety of media, including video, audio or podcasts.

“We tried a few podcasts when we launched the website to try to get our feet wet,” Wolfe said. “We tried several times to have an embedded video with stories.”

However, he said success was limited as there was no deadline to meet and stories could be published with or without a video attached.

“We can’t post webcasts without video,” Wolfe said.

Curtis was part of the inspiration for the webcast, Wolfe said.

An aspiring sportscaster, Curtis said Wolfe found him and convinced him to take the course.

“I said sign up for the course and I will,” Curtis said. “I’m glad I did. It’s super fun.”

Curtis said that although the show is tough, one of the things that has helped him in his role as a presenter is his involvement in forensics.

“Forensics helps a lot, so I’m saying if anyone’s ever wanted to get into broadcasting like this, like we’re doing right now, take forensics,” Curtis said. “It helps to talk, to advertise, to make sure people understand you. It just helps 20 times better.”

Summerfield, the editor of Spartan Spin, agreed that forensics helps.

“I think that’s what helps Jack,” Summerfield said. “Just with those few forensic practices, he became a better broadcaster in just two episodes we did.”

However, Summerfield acknowledges that scriptwriting — one of his favorite activities — for the show is different, “almost a different language,” he said.

“Webcasts are much more difficult than writing a story,” Summerfield said, but can reach a wider audience than the newspaper alone.

“Few students really enjoy reading,” Summerfield said. “Having a webcast that might actually pique their interest more and see our website and want to read our stories. Presenting it in a verbal way would help show them that news isn’t just about print.”

Curtis said he spoke to students who started reading the stories on the Spartan Spin website because of webcasting.

“I said ‘Great, read more,'” Curtis said. “We always have great stories here.”

Wolfe said his goal is to see how webcasting evolves as students learn new skills each week. This week, students will do their first live interview with a candidate running for city council; followed by another candidate next week, he said.

“I want this to prepare kids for 21st century journalism,” Wolfe said.

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Graduate students turn to broadcast journalism – Superior Telegram https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/graduate-students-turn-to-broadcast-journalism-superior-telegram/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 13:01:42 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/graduate-students-turn-to-broadcast-journalism-superior-telegram/ UPPER — A sign on the study room window reads: Recording in Progress, Please Quiet. Behind glass on the second floor of Upper High School, Xalia Raabel manages the camera, the computer used for a teleprompter, and spots anchor Jack Curtis, while Dale Summerfield Jr. sits in the corner and manages graphics on a screen […]]]>

UPPER — A sign on the study room window reads: Recording in Progress, Please Quiet.

Behind glass on the second floor of Upper High School, Xalia Raabel manages the camera, the computer used for a teleprompter, and spots anchor Jack Curtis, while Dale Summerfield Jr. sits in the corner and manages graphics on a screen behind Curtis’ left shoulder. .

Raabel points and Curtis begins to talk about the week’s news at senior high school – weather, sports, and the latest offerings in the school cafeteria as well as events in the greater community.

After several takes, Curtis rushes out the door on Thursday, February 3, saying they’ll use cue cards next time.

It’s all part of the learning process as the students who produce the student newspaper, the Spartan Spin, now share the news through a weekly webcast. The first webcast was posted on January 28 on Spin’s website, spartanspin.com.

The camera records host Jack Curtis as he reports stories for the Spartan Spin Weekly webcast Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022, at Superior High School in Superior, Wis.

Jed Carlson / Upper Telegram

“I want to introduce them to as many elements of journalism as I can introduce them to,” said Andy Wolfe, the senior high school teacher who teaches journalism. “I thought we had to do video and thought what better than to have weekly deadlines where they’re forced to do that.”

Wolfe said when the website launched three or four years ago, he knew he had to offer more than just text and graphics, components of the print newspaper. He said the electronic format should offer a variety of media, including video, audio or podcasts.

“We tried a few podcasts when we launched the website to try to get our feet wet,” Wolfe said. “We tried many times to integrate videos with stories.”

However, he said success was limited as there was no deadline to meet and stories could be published with or without a video attached.

“We can’t post webcasts without video,” Wolfe said.

Left to right, Tatum Williams, Jack Curtis, Dale Summerfield Jr., Cassie Aiken and Xalia Raabel work on the Spartan Spin Weekly

From left, Tatum Williams, Jack Curtis, Dale Summerfield Jr., Cassie Aiken, and Xalia Raabel work on the Spartan Spin Weekly, the new webcast produced by the newspaper class, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022, at Superior High School, Superior, Wis.

Jed Carlson / Upper Telegram

Curtis was part of the inspiration for the webcast, Wolfe said.

An aspiring sportscaster, Curtis said Wolfe found him and convinced him to take the course.

“I said sign up for the course and I will,” Curtis said. “I’m glad I did. It’s great fun.

Curtis said that although the show is tough, one of the things that has helped him in his role as a presenter is his involvement in forensics.

“Forensics helps a lot, so I’m saying if anyone’s ever wanted to get into broadcasting like this, like we’re doing right now, take forensics,” Curtis said. “It helps to talk, to advertise, to make sure people understand you. It just helps 20 times better.”

Summerfield, the editor of Spartan Spin, agreed that forensics helps.

“I think that’s what helps Jack,” Summerfield said. “Just with those few forensic practices, he became a better broadcaster in just two episodes we made.”

However, Summerfield acknowledges that scriptwriting — one of his favorite activities — for the show is different, “almost a different language,” he said.

“Webcasts are much more difficult than writing a story,” Summerfield said, but can reach a wider audience than the newspaper alone.

“Few students really enjoy reading,” Summerfield said. “By having a webcast that might actually pique their interest more and see our website and want to read our stories. Introducing it verbally would help show them that news isn’t just about print.

Curtis said he spoke to students who started reading the stories on the Spartan Spin website because of webcasting.

“I said ‘Great, read more,'” Curtis said. “We always have great stories here.”

Wolfe said his goal is to see how webcasting evolves as students learn new skills each week. This week, students will do their first live interview with a candidate running for city council; followed by another candidate next week, he said.

“I want it to be to prepare the children for the 21stst journalism of the century,” Wolfe said.

Cassie Aiken, left, and Tatum Williams, center, watch Xalia Raabel tweak the camera

Cassie Aiken, left, and Tatum Williams, center, watch Xalia Raabel tweak the camera as they work on the Spartan Spin Weekly webcast Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022, at Superior High School in Superior, Wis.

Jed Carlson / Upper Telegram

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Gazette Daily News Podcast, January 26 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/gazette-daily-news-podcast-january-26/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 10:13:33 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/gazette-daily-news-podcast-january-26/ Be sure to subscribe to The Gazette Daily news podcast, or simply tell your Amazon Alexa-enabled device to “turn on The Gazette Daily News skill” so you can get your daily briefing by simply saying “Alexa, what are the news? If you prefer podcasts, you can also find us on iTunes or wherever you find […]]]>

Be sure to subscribe to The Gazette Daily news podcast, or simply tell your Amazon Alexa-enabled device to “turn on The Gazette Daily News skill” so you can get your daily briefing by simply saying “Alexa, what are the news?

If you prefer podcasts, you can also find us on iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts.

I’m Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette’s Digital News Desk and I’m here with your Wednesday January 26th update.

Maggie Schmitt holds her face mask after school in Cedar Rapids on Wednesday, May 26, 2021. Maggie continues to wear her mask in her Prairie Hill kindergarten classroom and often continues to wear it after returning home. The College Community School District’s mask mandate was lifted last week after Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds signed into law a bill banning schools from requiring masks. (Liz Martin/The Gazette)

Temperatures are rising above 10 degrees. According to a National Weather Service forecast, sunny weather in the Cedar Rapids area will peak near 11 degrees. Wind chill values ​​drop as low as -25 degrees with gusts as high as 20 mph. Wednesday night will be partly cloudy with temperatures reaching 19 degrees Thursday morning. The wind chill will finally give us some respite as it rises to -5 degrees.

A federal appeals committee on Tuesday authorized the state of Iowa to enforce a law that prevents local schools from imposing mask mandates — but not for schools attended by students whose disabilities make them more vulnerable to serious illnesses if they contract COVID-19.

The appeals committee found that a mask requirement is a ‘reasonable accommodation’ for students with such disabilities and enabled a group of parents of children with disabilities to file a lawsuit seeking to overturn the law of the State of May 2021.

Two members of a three-judge panel at the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Omaha ruled that a previous federal judge’s decision to issue an injunction that blocked the state’s ban on mask mandates was too much. broad because it applied to all schools in the state.

The split nature of the ruling has led school districts to interpret it very differently. The Cedar Rapids School District, for example, decided on Tuesday to no longer require masking but to encourage it. The Iowa City School District, on the other hand, decided to maintain its mask requirements.

The opening of a magnet high school for freshmen and sophomores in the Cedar Rapids Community School District is delayed until at least fall 2023.

District officials originally proposed opening a magnet high school for the start of the 2022-23 school year.

After gathering feedback from staff, students, parents and residents on the concept of a magnetic high school, the district decided to delay its opening, Superintendent Noreen Bush said in an email to The Gazette.

Bush said it became “increasingly clear” that more time was needed to develop the magnet high school.

Iowa’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell to 3.5% in December, the Iowa Workforce Development reported Tuesday.

That’s down from 3.7% in November and 3.7% a year ago, the agency said in a news release.

IWD added that Iowa’s total number of unemployed fell to 57,900 in December, down 3,800 from November.

Motorists in Iowa would be prohibited from using cell phones or other electronic communication devices while driving under legislation approved by the House Transportation Committee on Tuesday.

If the legislation is approved by the Legislature, Iowa would join 25 other states in banning the use of electronic devices capable of sending or receiving messages and storing or displaying video while driving. . In states with hands-free legislation similar to that proposed in Iowa, there has been, on average, a 15% reduction in deaths, according to an insurance company representative who spoke Tuesday during a hearing on HF 392.

Iowa law now prohibits the use of portable electronic communication devices to write, send, or view electronic messages while driving. Under HF 392, using an electronic device would be a mobile violation. The fine for a violation would increase from $45 to $100.

Support for this podcast provided by New Pioneer Food Co-op. Celebrating 50 years as Eastern Iowa’s source for local, responsible groceries with stores in Iowa City, Coralville and Cedar Rapids; and online via Co-op Cart on newpi.coop.

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George Clooney studied broadcast journalism in college, but dropped out because he hated constant comparisons with his father https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/george-clooney-studied-broadcast-journalism-in-college-but-dropped-out-because-he-hated-constant-comparisons-with-his-father/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 11:03:37 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/george-clooney-studied-broadcast-journalism-in-college-but-dropped-out-because-he-hated-constant-comparisons-with-his-father/ [ad_1] For decades, George Clooney has amassed a long list of acting credits, and it would be hard for fans to imagine other people playing some of his roles. Before switching to television, however, he went to college for a completely different field of study. That’s because George Clooney initially wanted a career in broadcast […]]]>


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For decades, George Clooney has amassed a long list of acting credits, and it would be hard for fans to imagine other people playing some of his roles. Before switching to television, however, he went to college for a completely different field of study. That’s because George Clooney initially wanted a career in broadcast journalism – but gave up because of the constant comparisons to his father.

George Clooney studied audiovisual journalism in college before dropping out

George Clooney | Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images for Turner

After attending high school in Augusta, Ky., George Clooney enrolled at the University of Northern Kentucky, where he majored in broadcast journalism while at college, according to Biography. com.

The inspiration for her major in college probably came from her father, Nick Clooney, a well-known journalist and presenter. During dinners, Clooney’s family discussed the news. As a child, he followed his father to the newsroom and got involved in social activism. His dad admired news anchors like Edward R. Murrow, so Clooney was probably inspired to hear about these men.

In 1981, Clooney dropped out of school and had to figure out what he would do next. One of the reasons was that he doubted he would become a decent TV reporter. He also didn’t like being compared to his father, as many people recognized his name and the comparisons became tiresome. Still, Clooney would stay in the Cincinnati area for a while.

George Clooney once tried the Cincinnati Reds

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Many celebrities have different ambitions before making themselves known for their acting skills. Before Clooney became a household name as an actor, he first tried to be a sports athlete. In high school, he played college baseball and wanted to join a professional team.

Ever since Clooney grew up near Cincinnati, he loved the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. At the age of 16, he managed to get the opportunity to try out the Cincinnati Reds. Even though he and his friends thought he had a chance, he didn’t sign a contract with the team.

In an interview, Clooney admitted that he lacked the skills to be a professional player. It would appear that his fate does not involve baseball. College was Clooney’s next choice. Of course, it wouldn’t turn out the way he had hoped.

For a while, Clooney held a few jobs to get by – working as a shoe salesman and even picking tobacco on a farm – until he decided on another career path.

This is how George Clooney became an actor

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Clooney caught the acting bug when his cousin and uncle came to Kentucky to make a movie. They invited him to the set as an extra. The experience led him to take an interest in the acting profession. In fact, Clooney’s cousin suggested he move to California to become an actor.

While Clooney wanted movie roles, he slowly landed small roles in TV shows. His first major role was Ace in a sitcom titled E / R. He went on to tag another recurring character in the series. The facts of life from 1985 to 1987. While the novice actor searched for auditions, he pretended to be his own agent.

Clooney would brag about the casting directors, and he succeeded. Eventually he would find his big break in the hospital drama emergency. For 15 seasons, Clooney played Dr. Doug Ross and became an international celebrity.

Later, Clooney would go to the movies. Some of the films he’s known for include: Spy Kids, Ocean’s Eleven, Gravity, The Monuments Men, Leatherheads, Out of sight, Michael Clayton, The Descendants, and O brother, where are you?

RELATED: George Clooney Crushed John Krasinski In Basketball, But It Wasn’t The Best Time Of The Challenge

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Teen podcast host tackles mental health stigma https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/teen-podcast-host-tackles-mental-health-stigma/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 19:45:00 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/teen-podcast-host-tackles-mental-health-stigma/ [ad_1] LAND O ‘LAKES, Florida – This fall, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Children’s Hospital Association declared a national emergency in child and adolescent mental health. What would you like to know Advocacy groups have declared a national child and youth mental health emergency this […]]]>


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LAND O ‘LAKES, Florida – This fall, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Children’s Hospital Association declared a national emergency in child and adolescent mental health.


What would you like to know

  • Advocacy groups have declared a national child and youth mental health emergency this fall
  • Land O ‘Lakes teen Eliza Smith hosts a podcast discussing the mental health challenges teens and adults face
  • A doctor said his team had seen an increase in cases of problems such as anxiety, depression, overdoses and suicide attempts among young people in Tampa Bay.
  • Advocates say integrating mental health care into primary pediatric care and making more resources available in schools are among the steps they would like to see taken

“As healthcare professionals dedicated to the care of children and adolescents, we have witnessed an increase in the rates of mental health problems in children, adolescents and their families during the COVID-19 pandemic , exacerbating the situation that existed before the pandemic, ”the groups said in a statement released in October.

This is an issue that Eliza Smith says she is well aware of.

“Personally, I deal with depression and anxiety,” said Smith, a 16-year-old student at Land O ‘Lakes High School. “I know a lot of my friends who struggle with depression, anxiety, ADHD, ADD, and I really wanted to have a platform where we can raise awareness because there are a lot of stereotypes and stigma around health. mental. “

It’s like that “Be bold, be beautiful, be you” has been created. This is a podcast hosted by Smith that features interviews with friends and family on topics related to mental health.

“I want to kind of open up a field for conversation and help others and encourage others to get help and start these conversations,” Smith said.

Smith gave Spectrum Bay News 9 permission to watch a recording of a recent episode. She interviewed her friend, Jana Swank, 17, who told Smith she had suffered from anxiety since college.

“One thing I’m trying to stress is that anxiety, depression, having a mental illness are not the same for everyone. So tell me what it is, personally, for you.” , Smith asked during recording.

“I don’t really like talking to people I don’t know. I’m pretty sure you’ve seen this, but the first day of school when I saw you I didn’t tell you … about kept for me, ”Swank replied.

After the recording, Swank said it wasn’t a difficult decision to share his own journey of mental health.

“When she said to me, I was like, ‘I would love to be there. I would love to share my experiences and share what I have been through’, because sharing things can help people,” he said. she declared.

“To have people like Jana here and to have everyone that I’ve had so far is really heartwarming, and I really sympathize with them because we don’t hear the views and opinions very often. of our friends, ”Smith mentioned.

Dr Jennifer Katzenstein, co-director of the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Center for Behavior Health, said when it comes to mental health and youth in Tampa Bay, her team is seeing a significant increase in conditions such as anxiety, depression, disruptive behavior. , sleep problems, overdoses, suicide attempts and eating disorders. Like the advocacy groups that issued the national emergency declaration, Katzenstein said the pandemic appears to have exacerbated a problem that was already growing before COVID.

“We knew we did not have enough providers for both psychiatry and medication management, as well as therapists, counselors and psychologists to meet the mental health needs of our children and adolescents before the pandemic. Then, on top of that, we put the uncertainty of the pandemic, ever-changing information, and additional stressors for our families and children, both in terms of potentially financial needs, the loss of a parent, changes in education and lack of contact, ”Katzenstein said.

The AAP, AACAP and CHA said in their statement that they are calling for action from policy makers and advocates. Some of the actions they want to see taken include ensuring equal access to telehealth services, increasing the implementation and sustainable funding of school-based mental health care, and accelerating the development of school-based mental health care. adoption of integrated mental health care in primary care pediatrics. Katzenstein also stressed the importance of mental health care in primary care settings. She said efforts should be made to reduce the stigma young people face when seeking mental health supports and to strengthen the mental health workforce.

“As part of this declaration of emergency, I hope it has raised awareness among state and federal legislatures so that they are able to recognize the importance and need for mental health interventions for children, and at the same time, the necessary funding and advocacy supports to bring all of these ideas to life and prevent future mental health problems, ”Katzenstein said.

Smith said she would like to see more on-campus mental health resources in schools and educational programs for faculty, staff and students to learn to recognize the warning signs a person may be experiencing. with a mental problem and how to react correctly.

“It’s important that when we have these resources, we use them and empathize, if that makes sense, because there might be a kid in this class who needs to know that, and someone ‘one making a joke is unacceptable, “said Smith.

In addition to the podcast, Smith said she used her reign as the 2021 Miss Land O ‘Lakes Teen USA to raise awareness about mental health issues as well.

“I am happy that she took advantage of her own experiences and gave it to the world,” said Smith’s mother, Bhuneeta Parsan. “She doesn’t sugarcoat it or do what a lot of people do and lie and make it look like it’s not what it is. She’s honest, she’s open, she’s -” Take. It’s me. Take it or leave it ” .”

“The younger ones – teens, teens – we can experience these things,” Smith said of mental health issues. “A lot of people tend to ignore it and say, ‘Oh, you’re just a kid, your problems don’t matter.’ But it’s so important to recognize that their problems matter. “

Anyone interested in potentially appearing as a guest on an upcoming episode of Smith’s podcast can fill out this form.

Katzenstein recommends that parents spend time talking with their children away from electronic devices every day to check in. interactions. For school-aged children and teens, she said to watch out for some of those same signals, as well as more hopelessness, crying and anxiety, as well as loss of interest in children. activities they once enjoyed or changes in personal hygiene. Katzenstein said if children and teens say they are having thoughts of hurt on themselves or others, it’s time to ask for help.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, you can contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Warning signs that a person is considering suicide may include showing rage or talking about revenge, talking about being a burden to others, and looking for a way to kill themselves, such as looking up. online or buy a gun. Find out more here.

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ENMU Broadcast Journalism Student-Athlete Strives to Create Documentary Focuses on Importance of Athlete Mental Health https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/enmu-broadcast-journalism-student-athlete-strives-to-create-documentary-focuses-on-importance-of-athlete-mental-health/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 20:39:03 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/enmu-broadcast-journalism-student-athlete-strives-to-create-documentary-focuses-on-importance-of-athlete-mental-health/ [ad_1] Qitana Sapiga is majoring in Communications with a focus in Broadcast Journalism at Eastern New Mexico University and is considering becoming an ESPN Assistant Journalist or Sports Analyst. Dean’s List winner and member of the ENMU volleyball team, who is a junior this year, discusses her dreams of making a documentary that shows the […]]]>


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Qitana Sapiga is majoring in Communications with a focus in Broadcast Journalism at Eastern New Mexico University and is considering becoming an ESPN Assistant Journalist or Sports Analyst.

Dean’s List winner and member of the ENMU volleyball team, who is a junior this year, discusses her dreams of making a documentary that shows the importance of athlete mental health and other career goals .

What inspired you to participate in ENMU?

I chose ENMU not only because I was offered a sports scholarship, but because I knew the incredible opportunities I was going to receive through the communication department. The hands-on experience you can’t get anywhere else! I really feel like when I leave Eastern I’ll be more than ready to apply for a real job.

Why did you choose to study audiovisual journalism?

I chose this field of study because it encompasses all of my favorite interests. Speaking, public speaking and writing have always been easy for me. I love having open discussions and creating conversation, and to me that’s what broadcast journalism is all about.

What I like about the Communication major is that it is very broad. I can go into almost any career field I want with a communications degree. I consider communication to be one of my strengths and I see myself very well in this area.

The communications department at ENMU has also been a big part of my passion for broadcast journalism. I am currently a sports presenter of “News 3 New Mexico”, a show shot live in the KENW communications building on campus, and I am also a co-host of “Highschool Spotlight”, which is a featured segment on every episode of “SportsLook,” a talk show run by the one and only Doc Elder.

Working with Doc and watching him in his trade has taught me so much. He’s a great person to admire because he’s one of the most talented people I know and is an inspiration to everyone he meets! Because I get hands-on training in the communications department, I can get a feel for the industry and what it will be like in the “real world”.

I love writing scripts for my sports show, I love being in front of the camera and sharing the thoughts I have come up with, and I love creating this opportunity for a group of people to chat. Whether three people watch our show or a million, I love being the person who starts a conversation with the audience.

Qitana visiting Bennett’s farm with her teammates.
qitana with the team

What are your career goals?

I hope to someday work for ESPN as a secondary reporter or become a sports analyst. What attracted me to sports is that I have been surrounded by gambling my whole life. My whole identity is to be an athlete, and I love it so much that even when I retire from sport, I still want to be a part of it in some way or another.

I love being a sports presenter for “News 3”, but one of my goals is to be able to host post-match interviews and to be able to have one-on-one meetings with athletes. Writing articles and recaps of matches is good and all, but I really feel that my vocation is to be face to face with athletes who interview them! As I mentioned before, I love to create a conversation, and a one-on-one interview is the best way to do that.

Ultimately, my dream is to broadcast the Olympics! I watch the Summer Olympics every four years, but after watching Tokyo 2020, I wish I could be a reporter at the Olympics. The Olympics are probably the highest level an athlete can reach, so being able to be in that atmosphere with the athletes and being able to interview them or report games would be my ultimate goal.

What other dreams do you have?

To be honest, while I’m very sure where I want to go for my future career in broadcast journalism, I still have a lot of interests outside of this field.

Some of my dreams outside of communications are to own a bakery, to become an entrepreneur, to create a resource for athletes struggling with their mental health, to become a talk show host, to have my own talk show. and practice volleyball. For now, I’ll be focusing on my future in broadcasting, but I’ll definitely keep those interests in my back pocket.

qitana with group outside
Qitana with his teammates during a football scrum.

Are you working on research at ENMU?

I am not currently working on any research project; however, I would like to create a documentary highlighting the importance of mental health in athletes. As a student-athlete myself, I have had my own personal experience of poor mental health. I don’t think people really understand the stress and emotional roller coaster that athletes face on a daily basis, so I would like to raise awareness about that.

I would also like to shed some light on the treatment of female athletes in a male dominated industry. From college to professional level, female athletes do not receive the same treatment as male athletes. This has been posted several times, and I would like to think that maybe one day I can make a difference, big or small. For now, I will continue to do my research, but I would like to have an open discussion on this topic and start a conversation that needs to happen.

What activities do you participate in at ENMU?

Outside of the classroom, you can find me at the arena! I’m on the women’s volleyball team, so if I’m not in the communications building for “News 3” or “Highschool Spotlight” I’m probably at the arena! I also work at the Max Pac when I have free time.

What is your advice to students who wish to pursue a degree in audiovisual journalism?

For anyone interested in broadcast journalism, I would say to enroll in Comm 344 Broadcast Practicum in order to have the best practical experience. A lot of students don’t know that KENW produces their own shows (like “News 3 New Mexico”), and that’s where I get a lot of experience. If you are seriously considering writing or broadcasting or becoming a talent on camera in the future, take this course because you will learn so much and feel like you are part of a news station!

Which professors at Eastern have mentored you?

Chris Leclure was not a professor at ENMU, but he worked at KENW and mentored me a lot for “News 3”. He’s not at Eastern anymore, but he taught me a lot, motivated me and gave me the confidence I needed to be in front of the camera. He is someone who is currently working in the industry and knows exactly what it takes to “do it”. Before leaving ENMU he and I had many discussions about what I need to work on, things I should focus on, my strengths, my weaknesses and he made me very excited to continue my studies. dreams in this industry.

Where is your favorite place on the ENMU campus?

My favorite place on campus is the Golden Student Success Center, and it’s not for studying or reading books; it’s because Einstein Bros. Bagels is here! I’m always on the hunt for a great bagel and coffee or avocado toast and smoothie, so Einstein’s is my breakfast or lunch go-to! My second favorite place is Campus Union because of the WOW Cafe, and I can see my friends.

qitana with the team inside

Tell us about your family and your background.

I was born and raised in Long Beach, California with three siblings, two sisters and a brother. My younger brother is currently in second year at Los Alamitos High School, my younger sister is in first year at Adams State University and my older sister and I are in Eastern, going to school together and playing volleyball -ball together! She is a senior and obtains a diploma in social work in the spring.

My mom is a manager of a freight company and my dad is a social worker for the Orange County Department, as well as a graduate professor at California State University Long Beach and California State University Dominguez Hills, and he teaches social work. . How well he should be able to teach his own trade! He loves what he does, and he and my mom always work hard to provide for our family.

Which class at Eastern stood out to you the most?

My favorite class at ENMU is any class Edward Caffrey teaches! He’s a great teacher, and from the moment you walk into the classroom you can tell how passionate he is with what he teaches. He makes his lectures fun and interactive, and I have learned a lot from the many classes I have taken with him.

What is your favorite aspect of Greyhound life?

My favorite part of being a Greyhound is the small community that is Portales! Even though Portales is a small town, the people are what make the community so united and cohesive.

I was born and raised in Long Beach, California with three siblings, two sisters and a brother. My younger brother is currently in second year at Los Alamitos High School, my younger sister is in first year at Adams State University and my older sister and I are in Eastern, going to school together and playing volleyball -ball together! She is senior and obtains a diploma in social work in the spring.

My mom is a manager of a freight company and my dad is a social worker for the Orange County Department, as well as a graduate professor at California State University Long Beach and California State University Dominguez Hills, and he teaches social work. . How well he should be able to teach his own trade! He loves what he does, and he and my mom always work hard to provide for our family.

What are your hobbies?

Because I have been a student-athlete my whole life, I haven’t had a lot of free time to develop hobbies. But I love to cook and try new recipes so I would consider it a hobby. I like to do any type of artistic and craft activity. As long as I’m with my family, any activity is fun!

Anything else you would like to share?

I like dogs! I can’t have mine yet, so I still babysit my friends’ dogs when I can. I would like to have my own dog one day, but maybe when I get settled somewhere and can afford to take care of it.

Qitana with her family during a Dodgers game.
qitana with family

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The first cycle bridges the educational divide with the start-up Ed-Tech https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/the-first-cycle-bridges-the-educational-divide-with-the-start-up-ed-tech/ https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/the-first-cycle-bridges-the-educational-divide-with-the-start-up-ed-tech/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 02:23:10 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/the-first-cycle-bridges-the-educational-divide-with-the-start-up-ed-tech/ [ad_1] Growing up in India, Kartikay Uniyal (SFS-Q ’23) spent his weekends in high school volunteering to teach at various public schools near his home. It was then that he began to notice the educational disparities faced by students across India. Then, with the COVID-19 pandemic forcing more than 250 million students to adapt to […]]]>


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Growing up in India, Kartikay Uniyal (SFS-Q ’23) spent his weekends in high school volunteering to teach at various public schools near his home. It was then that he began to notice the educational disparities faced by students across India.

Then, with the COVID-19 pandemic forcing more than 250 million students to adapt to new learning styles, especially with distance education, Uniyal had an idea. What if he could try to bridge the gap between students by creating an online learning platform that would allow students to add free self-study videos and chat features to their school curricula?

The answer to that was Access Labs, an educational technology platform Uniyal founded in 2020 alongside the Peace Innovation Lab at Stanford University. The Hoya spoke with Uniyal to learn more about Access Lab and its current reach to students in Delhi, India, today.

Podcast transcript:

UK: Of course, so I am Kartikeya.

FR : The other day I was lucky enough to call Kartikeya Uniyal (SFS-Q ’23), a junior at the School of Foreign Service at the Georgetown campus in Doha, Qatar. As I had just finished lunch, Uniyal was in her dormitory finishing her day, our call being between seven hours of jet lag and over 6,000 miles apart.

UK: I am in the dormitories we have in Qatar. So they look pretty good I guess.

FR : The white cinder blocks behind Uniyal are indeed a college dormitory staple – just ask any freshman living in the New South. And aside from decorating the dorms, I called Uniyal to discuss a project he’s been working on for over a year now called Access Labs. But let him explain himself.

KU: So, Access Labs in 30 Seconds is simply a technology intervention or solution to make ed technology more accessible and through this we make education accessible, achievable and enforceable.

FR : Ed technology, by the way, is exactly what it sounds like. Educational technology is a growing field that examines the type of digital technology that students of all ages can use to facilitate their learning both in and out of the traditional classroom space.

KU: At present, all forms of ED Tech, even if they are free, are not accessible to the majority of populations. And that goes for any website from Coursera to YouTube, however we choose the organization’s point of view would be that none of them are actually accessible and that the skills you are aiming for draw is not feasible.

FR : In case you were wondering, explaining what Access Labs is takes longer than the 30 seconds Uniyal expected. So let’s take a step back here. Uniyal, originally from India, started noticing the prevalence of educational disparities when he was in high school. He volunteered to help teach public school students on weekends and couldn’t help but compare his own experiences as a student in a private school and the wide range of experiences among other students.

UK: I come from a private school in India. Private schools are not the same as in USA As there are a lot of private schools in India and the fees are not that high but the disparity in education is. So I was able to compare the two experiences and see the radical change. And that’s what kept me involved at least in the public education sector and yes. But when we saw COVID affecting it and students were out of school, out of school, out of everything, that’s what pushed us in that direction to make these ed-tech interventions, which the government already has more accessible.

FR : As with many things, the COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated educational divisions among students in India. India’s education system is incredibly large with over 1.5 million schools serving over 250 million children, according to a 2018 UNICEF report. So when the pandemic forced these schools to close their doors suddenly, like everywhere in the world, education has become incredibly dependent on virtual education. For Uniyal, not only did students benefit from different school experiences depending on factors such as socio-economic background and internet access, but many families simply did not have the capacity for electronic devices to support their students. .

UK: When I was talking to students in India that I knew from my weekend experiences, they would say that, say it was a family of three, the oldest would have the phone to take classes and the others would not. So they changed their minds, but basically the 10 year old was lacking in education because his brother was, say, in grade ten. And that for me was quite upsetting.

FR : So Uniyal was addicted. What could he do to improve not only the existing educational disparities in India, but those which were now dire during the pandemic? And that’s how Access Labs was born. Uniyal founded Access Labs in 2020 alongside another student from the University of Delhi. Their program aims to provide an online educational service to Grades 8-12 students across India through self-designed step-by-step schooling tools such as video lessons and chat boxes enabling students to To ask questions. The lineup officially kicked off in November 2020, and as we speak, students, mostly focused in Delhi, are taking free classes in subjects ranging from entrepreneurship, justice, and data science.

UK: We designed them thinking from the perspective of a student in Grades 8-12. It’s something short because they don’t have the time or their attention span is too short, and it’s really activity-oriented because just watching a video no longer achieves these goals for us. But in general, the line of thinking we use for the implementation is that it is open access. So if anyone in sixth grade wants to follow him, he is welcome. If someone who is 60 years old, they are welcome. Everything is therefore open access. This makes the product very varied in its scope.

FR : On a larger scale, Access Labs has a lot more to do with this idea of ​​educational equity than just putting good, accessible online content into the hands of as many students as possible. For Uniyal it boils down to yes, what kind of education different people have access to, but why do we need to ask this question in the first place. Why do we see education, and really knowledge, as an asset for some but not for all?

UK: Basically our goal here is to somehow change our approach to learning. Even the courses we take in Georgetown, for example, there is an element of hierarchy in there, isn’t there? There is information coming from above. And what this means is that we believe that some communities do not have the means to have knowledge or information. And we don’t want it to stay that way. So, for example, if there is a student studying in rural India, we don’t want to assume that my Delhi designed curriculum is what he has to learn to escape that rural area, for example, or escape to his situation. So there is knowledge everywhere and there is learning everywhere. We just want them to know that there are enough ways today for them to translate their knowledge into something that can help them reach their means.

FR : To actually set up Access Labs, Uniyal worked with the Peace Innovation Lab at Stanford University, which is a lab that works with businesses, students, governments, NGOs, or anyone else who has an interest in improving cooperation and innovation with those across a border, be it gender, class, religion or age. During the summer of 2020, Uniyal worked with the Lab to leverage his ideas on how to bridge the education gap in India and they helped provide funding and support as he worked on the development of the online platform which is now Access Labs. Despite the support Uniyal has received, the challenges of keeping Access Labs afloat still exist.

UK: Mainly in terms of supporting other nonprofits, we haven’t received much just because our solution is sometimes deemed too cumbersome or too difficult to implement. Also, there is currently a bit of resistance in the nonprofit space in India to seed nonprofits, that’s what I call it now, because we haven’t received funding from philanthropic or charity or from a billionaire who is supposed to do something little work. We really want to step in and make a difference. And we think a lot of education NGOs are not doing that in India right now.

FR : Ultimately, Uniyal hopes that Access Labs will be one of many steps in determining how we, especially students at an institution like Georgetown, understand and come to see the value of our higher education.

UK: We do not understand the full meaning of this learning experience or this resource and at the same time, millions of people are deprived of this resource. And if we keep restricting knowledge, that means we keep restricting resources and if we keep restricting resources, we keep creating that divide. So basically we are complicit and if we don’t accept that we don’t do anything.

FR : And while Uniyal still has a year to go until graduation, Access Labs is its future. For him, there is a countdown involved.

UK: I mean I seriously consider this to be a race between us and these private schools in India that have access to all of these resources. And we just need to make everything available to as many people as possible before they offer it to their students.

FR : And that’s all we have for you today. This podcast was recorded, edited and produced by Grace Buono. Special thanks to Kartikeya Uniyal for taking the time, despite the time change, to speak with The Hoya. Oh, and in case you haven’t heard, The Hoya’s media team is growing. Be sure to check out all of our content this week, including new video work. Otherwise, see you next week.


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Marion County Tech Center wants to add broadcast journalism, aviation | Local News https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/marion-county-tech-center-wants-to-add-broadcast-journalism-aviation-local-news/ https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/marion-county-tech-center-wants-to-add-broadcast-journalism-aviation-local-news/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/marion-county-tech-center-wants-to-add-broadcast-journalism-aviation-local-news/ [ad_1] RACHEL – The Marion County Tech Center wants to incorporate broadcast journalism and aviation into its catalog of available courses. Ahead of their regular meeting, the Marion County School Board held a special session Monday night with Jay Michael, director of the MCTC, to discuss new classes planned at the technical center for high […]]]>


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RACHEL – The Marion County Tech Center wants to incorporate broadcast journalism and aviation into its catalog of available courses.

Ahead of their regular meeting, the Marion County School Board held a special session Monday night with Jay Michael, director of the MCTC, to discuss new classes planned at the technical center for high school students.

The Board of Directors met in the MCTC Multipurpose Hall on its campus next to North Marion High. The first of the two courses offered is an audiovisual journalism course.

“It would be journalism [course]”said Michel.”[West Virginia University] is a big, big journalism program. That would give [students] a great start in a great local option.

The second program is an introductory aviation course. Michael called it an exploratory course, allowing students to test the field and see if it interests them, without spending thousands of dollars to enroll in a college-level course at Fairmont State University or the Pierpont Community & Technical College.

Students taking this course would not complete high school with additional certifications like in other courses offered at MCTC.

If the aviation program kicks off as planned, students will complete the course before their junior year, allowing them to enroll in the aviation course at Pierpont or Fairmont with a head start.

“I think this program will give [students] one step ahead when they enter a program, ”said Michael. “Have these four [aviation] the classes will give them a great experience on their own, and if they don’t decide to continue after high school to do so, that’s okay too. It’s just exploratory. “

Michael said he is sure the students and Marion County will benefit from these two new programs.

“These two programs, in my opinion, are win-win programs,” said Michael. “They’re good for kids … and I think we’ll attract a whole different kind of student.” “

Board members are in favor of the technical center moving forward with the planning of these programs.

“I like the idea of ​​broadcast journalism,” said Donna Costello, school board vice president. “For these students to go back to their schools and record and report what is happening… I really appreciate that [idea]. “

Teaching positions for these programs will be posted once planning is complete.

Regular session

After the special session with Jay Michael on the MCTC, the board began its regular business on Monday evening. Most of the items on the agenda were routine business transactions, but Donna Hage, Principal of the Marion County School, gave some numbers regarding enrollment.

Preliminary figures, before the official count in October, show a drop in registrations compared to last year. Current figures show that the number of enrollments is 7,418 students, compared to 7,664 students last year, a decrease of 246 students.

These are preliminary figures, but if the number of students enrolled remains this low, that would mean a decrease of more than $ 1 million in state funding.

“It’s not official, we won’t have official numbers until October,” Hage said.

One factor contributing to the decline in enrollment is an increasing number of parents who are choosing to home school their children. At the start of the fall semester, 661 students were home-schooled, now 708.

Costello questioned why parents are pulling children out of schools and several parents in attendance took turns shouting, “I can answer that.” Costello calmed the crowd and allowed Hage to respond.

Hage said the pandemic and its rules and complications are a factor in these parents’ decisions.

“There are a lot of conversations, [the reason for home schooling] is not something a parent clarifies through a form or through an email, ”Hage said. “But I think the pandemic certainly had an impact on those decisions. “

The council will meet again on September 15 at the central office at 1 p.m. for a special session, then a regular session on September 28 at the central office at 6 p.m.

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Plymouth North Broadcast Journalism Team Wins Student Emmy Awards https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/plymouth-north-broadcast-journalism-team-wins-student-emmy-awards/ https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/plymouth-north-broadcast-journalism-team-wins-student-emmy-awards/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://clatskaniechiefnews.com/plymouth-north-broadcast-journalism-team-wins-student-emmy-awards/ [ad_1] PLYMOUTH – The pandemic hasn’t stopped Plymouth North High School’s broadcast journalism team from their annual Newscasting Excellence Series. Smaller than normal due to COVID-19 restrictions, the Plymouth North News team was nonetheless powerful, winning two first-place awards in the recent 2021 Boston National Academy of Television Art and Sciences Regional Student Production Awards. […]]]>


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PLYMOUTH – The pandemic hasn’t stopped Plymouth North High School’s broadcast journalism team from their annual Newscasting Excellence Series.

Smaller than normal due to COVID-19 restrictions, the Plymouth North News team was nonetheless powerful, winning two first-place awards in the recent 2021 Boston National Academy of Television Art and Sciences Regional Student Production Awards. / New England.

The eight-person team won the Student Emmy for Best High School Magazine Program for their first show of the year – which aired in October, as students still adjusted to a blended learning model.

The show examined the issue of fairness and justice in the school and in the community, examined a marketing student initiative to promote local buying, and explained the new COVID-19 rules surrounding autumn sports.

The team of Amber Pestana and Caroline Richards also won a Student Emmy for High School Arts and Entertainment / Cultural Affairs for their “Spotlight on Brooke Potvin,” a story about a Plymouth North senior who became a social media influencer. social media during the pandemic.

Shelley Terry teaches the broadcast news program with Evan McNamara. Terry said the pandemic posed planning challenges as members of the press team were split into two groups for most of the year.

The Plymouth North News team recently won a Student Emmy for the best magazine to broadcast in New England.

Terry had six students two days a week and two students the other two days, but the group did not meet until after the return to in-person learning in April.

The students nevertheless rose to the challenge, with some participating in remote planning sessions.

“We had some real shining stars who worked really hard,” said Terry, citing students Bailey Norton and Caroline Richards for their efforts on this year’s live show. Technical difficulties prevented the presenters from practicing their roles, but they were successful in the live performance.

The PNN team gathers before a show.

Terry also credited Caroline Richards and Amber Pestana’s partnership during the year. “They were the best partners, and that’s one of the best things you can be in this business – be a great partner and always invest 110%,” she said.

Terry also noted the work of Karen Phan. “Karen brought so many story ideas and had the passion, enthusiasm and positivity that we needed,” said Terry.

Although they are forced to alternate school days for much of the year, members of the press team were able to reunite last summer for a three-day training camp that will take them to the next level. presented the basics of the program. Over the course of the year, they produced six shows, which is down from the usual nine or 10, but impressive considering the odd year.

Plymouth North News also received four honorable mentions at the Student Emmy Awards.

The team’s second and third shows last fall won honorable mention. The team also received an honorable mention for its sporting history on the swim team. Kailey Reardon and Caroline Richards received honorable mention for their light reporting on “Virtual DECA”.

The Plymouth North News team recently won a Student Emmy for the best magazine to broadcast in New England.

This year’s award-winning Plymouth North News team members are Christian Hohulin, Jamie Keep, Andrew Melville, Bailey Norton, Amber Pestana, Karen Phan, Kailey Reardon and Caroline Richards.

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